FAQs

Torah-based Morality

Can one realistically never be angry?

QUESTION from a Noahide friend: I have been trying to follow the moral conducts as outlined in chapter 8 of Part I : “The Fundamentals of the Faith” in the book “THE DIVINE CODE” by Rabbi Moshe Weiner. While certainly most of the points regarding the conduct were already being followed by me, I find it is becoming difficult to follow the first point: never to be angry. Read more »

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Should parents push college?

Question:

I feel as if I’m living the movie “Failure to Launch”… my two oldest kids (22 yr old daughter, and 19 yr old son) don’t seem to want to grow up. They both have a good work ethic, and enjoy their jobs, but the jobs are low wage introductory positions. My son is a cook, my daughter a cashier. It seems that, apart from a miracle (and I’m not against miracles) they’ll need a degree in order to get a job which will support their own families, but neither one is motivated about school…

Last night my son said he’s not sure he wants to go back to school next semester!?!! I’m sure this is just a symptom of something deeper, perhaps a deficiency on my part, and that makes it tough to read into and guess how to solve this without a ton of more information I’m sure, but maybe someone has some experience or ideas? I’d love to hear some input or encouragement on the matter. Read more »

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What can we learn from the Noahide Commandments?

Contemplation in the Seven Noahide Commandments

by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, author of “The Divine Code”

Translated by Rabbi Yosef Schulman, Assistant Director

Edited by Dr. Michael Schulman, Executive Director

Every person is obligated to contemplate the commands given explicitly to him by G-d and to understand everything that he is obligated and forbidden to do, and how to better his character. Therefore, a Gentile should contemplate the 7 Noahide Commandments, and what one can learn from them to rectify his nature and correct his deeds. Of primary importance is contemplation on the very fact that G-d gave commands to mankind. This teaches that G-d has purpose in the world – and anticipates the world coming to its proper rectification – through the actions of mankind. G-d’s commands teach that a person is able to do meaningful good deeds and rectify himself and his environment. Surely a person should not view himself as being naturally evil, nor imagine that it is impossible to change one’s nature to goodness. Rather, a person should know and believe that since G-d commanded him and anticipates his doing specific good actions, G-d surely has given him the power and capability to accomplish this. To this end, the following lessons can be learned from each of the Noahide Laws. Read more »

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Are there any animals that we can learn from?

The Mishnah says: “Be bold as a leopard, light as an eagle, swift as a deer, and strong as a lion, to do the will of your Father in Heaven.”[1] What does this mean? Here is the answer from Rabbi Moshe Weiner of Jerusalem: Read more »

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A lesson from Sinai: Is there morality without commandments?

Moses-and-second-tablets-on-yom-kippur

Moses Descending Mt. Sinai with the Two Tablets

QUESTION : Can’t a Noahide (or any human being) just live as a good person in their own eyes, deciding right and wrong based on their conscience? Read more »

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