Can I develop my own personalized prayer liturgy?

There is not any “official” or “universal” Noahide liturgy for any defined prayer services. On a deeper level, this is really as it should be, because a fixed liturgy could give a Noahide the mistaken impression that he or she has a religious requirement to recite specific prayers at set times of day, or at set days on the calendar, which is not the case. Rather, the minimum obligation of prayer for a Noahide is that when you recognize that you have a need, you should direct your mind to G-d and pray to Him to fulfill that need. When you do that, you can gain even more merit at the same time by having full trust and faith that He hears your prayers and that He will answer in a way that will be truly and openly good for you.* Similarly, when you feel religiously inspired or motivated and want to pray, that prayer should be directed only to the One True G-d, and it can include praising Him and thanking Him, 

Although G-d knows all the thoughts of a person, it is most appropriate that your prayers should be verbalized with the mouth (since only that is called “prayer”), at least loudly enough so that you can hear your own speech. In that way not only your mind but also your body is praising and praying to G-d, as we are told to do in many verses of the Psalms.

If you are developing a personalized liturgy, it is appropriate to make selections from the Psalms (reading from an authentic Hebrew Bible/Tanakh or Book of Psalms/Tehillim that is printed by an observant Hebrew publishing house), translated into the language you best understand. King David composed and compiled the entire Book of Psalms to reflect every emotional dimension that a spiritually directed person could experience. You are certainly free to choose Psalms which seem most appropriate for the feelings you wish to convey to G-d.

To assist Noahides in their daily prayers, Ask Noah International has published a booklet of daily prayers for Noahides:

“Prayers, Blessings, Principles of Faith, and Divine Service for Noahides,” by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Rabbi J. Immanuel Schochet.

*(For more on this general obligation to direct prayers to the One True G-d, see Rambam, Mishneh Torah, Laws of Prayer 1:1. For more on the inclusion of Gentiles in this general intellectual obligation, see the classical teachings of Rabbi Sa’adia Ga’on quoted in Or Same’ach Hilchot Tefillah ch. 1, and the modern rulings of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein in Igrot Moshe Orach Chayim v. 2, ch. 25.)

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