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shehecheyanu blessing
#1
Shalom Director Michael and Esteemed Rabbis!
Can we say the "Shehecheyanu" blessing? (for Channukah and so forth?)
Thank you!
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#2
As a Noahide, you may say that blessing (in the language you understand) upon enjoying some especially happy occasion (e.g. seeing a good friend after a long time, moving into a new home, buying new clothes, etc.), but not upon the arrival of a Jewish religious festival (e.g. Hanukkah, Passover, Rosh Hashanah, etc.). Because that would be like accepting the Jewish festival as a religious holy day for yourself, which it's not.
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#3
Director Michael Wrote:As a Noahide, you may say that blessing (in the language you understand) upon enjoying some especially happy occasion (e.g. seeing a good friend after a long time, moving into a new home, buying new clothes, etc.), but not upon the arrival of a Jewish religious festival (e.g. Hanukkah, Passover, Rosh Hashanah, etc.). Because that would be like accepting the Jewish festival as a religious holy day for yourself, which it's not.

I have a question, I am new to the movement of the Noahide, and I want to understand something in a more clear presentation.

If it is unacceptable to observe Jewish festivals as a holy day for ourselves, then what holy days can we observe? If we observe idolatry-based holidays it is wrong, so this leaves nothing for a gentile to observe in awe, and holiness to our L-rd G-d.
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#4
A Noahide may recognize the special quality of the Seventh Day, but not in a way of "keeping" a Sabbath of sanctified restraint as Jews are commanded to do. Since Saturday is often a weekend "day off" for resting from work in the secular world, a Noahide who has Friday night and/or or Saturday day off from work can use some of that time to do extra Torah learning (as allowed), or quality time with family, or charity projects, etc., or general physical rest and relaxation. A Noahide can cook nicer meals during that time, and/or light one or more candles on the Friday night dinner table to make it a more beautiful meal. See our updated web page

https://asknoah.org/essay/the-seventh-day

A Noahide is encouraged to take extra time for prayer and repentance before and on Rosh HaShanah (the Jewish New Year), because all people are judged by G-d on that day, and G-d makes decrees for the person's life in the year ahead. A Noahide can mark the historical and spiritual significance of Shavuot (but not by refraining from doing the activities that Jews are forbidden to do on their festival days), because through the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai (which is epitomized by the Ten Commandments that G-d spoke to the Jews on the first day of Shavuot), Noahides have the opportunity to perform their seven precepts as "mitzvot" commandments, and thus receive a part in the eternal World to Come. See our web page

https://asknoah.org/essay/noahide-holidays

It seems acceptable that a Noahide can light Hanukkah candles that will be visible outside the home (without reciting any blessings), for the sake of publicizing the Hanukkah miracle to his neighborhood and passersby.

A Noahide can assign one or more specific days to be dedicated for prayers and thanks to G-d, as for example the Gentile tradition of a Thanksgiving Day (although every day should be a day of thanksgiving). Likewise for honoring one's mother on Mother's Day, and one's father on Father's Day (although every day should be a day for honoring one's parents, if one has the opportunity to do so).
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