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Questions about "The Divine Code"
01-13-2010, 01:56 AM (This post was last modified: 10-10-2017 01:28 PM by Director Michael.)
Post: #1
Questions about "The Divine Code"
B"H

With peace, blessings and the utmost respect,

It has occurred to me that though I live by and hold by Noahide Law as set down by Rav Moshe Weiner and Ask Noah International in the book "The Divine Code" and through this forum, I am without an inarguable reason for doing so.

Certain aspects of Noahide Law is, even after the publication of "The Divine Code", debated. Those who teach differently than Rav Weiner do so according to their objective understanding of each matter: and many Noahides follow their words.

How is this finally determined?

(Approbations have been given for "The Divine Code". I do not know how this is with others who teach differently. Perhaps the answer lies there.)
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01-18-2010, 06:11 PM (This post was last modified: 07-30-2011 07:58 AM by Director Michael.)
Post: #2
RE: Authority of "The Divine Code".
You are correct in that the answer is connected with the Approbations.

Rabbi Weiner is a recognized G-d Fearing Torah Scholar in serious Rabbinic circles, and as such he did not undertake this significant work on his own authority. Each step of the way, in his four years of dedicated work and exceptionally thorough research on the two volumes of "Sheva Mitzvot HaShem" ("Seven Divine Commandments") in Torah-Law Hebrew, he consulted and sought the approval of outstanding Halachic authorities, as explained on this web page:

http://www.judaism.com/display.asp?etn=CDGCD

His work was fully reviewed in detail, and annotated in the printed version, by one of the Chief Justices of the Supreme Rabbinical Court of Israel, Rav Zalman Nechemiah Goldberg. Rav Z.N. Goldberg is universally recognized as one of the outstanding Torah scholars of our generation. (He is also the son-in-law of one of the greatest Torah Authorities of our Generation, Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach.)

"Sheva Mitzvot HaShem" has the approbations of both the Ashkenazic and Sefardic Chief Rabbis of Israel, Rav Metzger and Rav Amar, respectively. You can read their translated letters in full on this page:

http://asknoah.org/books/the-divine-code
To view scanned copies of the original letters:
http://asknoah.org/wp-content/uploads/Ra...essing.pdf
http://asknoah.org/wp-content/uploads/Ra...essing.pdf

This work also received glowing approbations from Rav Gedalia Dov Schwartz, the Head of the Beis Din (Rabbinical Court) of the Rabbinical Council of America and the Rabbinical Council of Chicago. Rav J. Immanuel Schochet, who is a prominent Torah Scholar and a prolific author of fundamental Torah texts, in Toronto, Canada, also participated in the project, and contributed a great deal to the section in Volume 1 on recommended prayers for righteous Gentiles, and most of the Section Introductions in "The Divine Code."

In the Introduction to his work, Rabbi Weiner clearly explains the fundamental principles for understanding and codifying the practical applications of the Noahide Mitzvot, including the main (but not sole) authority in this area of Torah that is accorded to the teachings of "Rambam," Rabbi Moses Maimonides. Rabbi Weiner also drew much inspiration from the homiletics on the Noahide Mitzvot in the classic book "Mitzvos Hashem" by Rabbi Yonasan Shteif, who was the Chief Rabbi of Vienna, Austria, before WWll.

For the Gentile world, the book series "The Divine Code" is the English translation approved by Rabbi Weiner, with editorial notes, of "Sheva Mitzvot HaShem":

http://www.judaism.com/display.asp?etn=CDGCG

This English volume has been presented to and found praiseworthy by several English-speaking Chassidic Rebbes, and one of the Justices of the Rabbinic Court of the Eidah HaChareidis of Jerusalem. "Sheva Mitzvot HaShem" and "The Divine Code" are published by Ask Noah International, and can also be obtained directly through this web site.

Seldom do you find such unanimous approval from so many various groups and segments within the branches of Traditional Torah Judaism. All of this is what sets "Sheva Mitzvot HaShem" and "The Divine Code" apart from any other books that have ever been written about the practical Torah-Law applications of the Noahide Code.

In these books, Rabbi Weiner explains where some contemporary Rabbis have given opinions that are more stringent than necessary on some aspects of observance (and note that righteous Gentiles may *voluntarily* choose to follow extra stringency in some areas if they wish), while in some other aspects, opinions have been given that are overly lenient (including in some matters that involve cross-over into uniquely Jewish Mitzvot, or that are contrary to the general obligation that Gentiles have for acting in accordance with "yishuv olom" - establishing, and not detracting from, the Torah's ideals for settled, orderly and law-abiding societies for the world's inhabitants).

In any event, everything is footnoted for those who want to look into the Torah-based sources in more depth.

Rabbi Yitz
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07-28-2011, 03:02 AM (This post was last modified: 07-30-2011 07:59 AM by Director Michael.)
Post: #3
RE: Authority of "The Divine Code"
I have received my copy of the Second Edition of "The Divine Code" and am studying it. I have been using a highlighter to mark those passages in the general text that are further elaborated on in the lower part of the page with the pertinent text in BOLD. I am using the highlighter because, whereas passages where citation is needed are marked with footnotes by very small type numerals, the passages I speak of in the main body are not marked in any way to show there is any amplification of the passage below.
Now, I do NOT see this as an oversight, nor would I want it changed, because for me, going through the book page by page first to see if there are any such pages that (I think) need highlighting helps give me a quick scan of the material before I actually knuckle down and study it intently.
This is what I did with the first edition, and what I plan to do with Volume 2 when it is released.
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10-10-2017, 02:01 PM
Post: #4
RE: Questions about "The Divine Code"
Hello,

First I'd like to thank Director Michael for his quick reply and for directing me to this thread.

I have a question about the different editions of "The Divine Code". I currently have the "Second Edition Vol.1" that I bought a few years ago. Earlier today I saw two other versions in the AskNoah store. One is "Parts I-IV: Guide to the Noahide Code" and "Limited Edition Parts I-VII". Should I get one or both of these editions? Also does one go more in depth than the other? Thank you for for any help. Smile
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10-11-2017, 12:35 AM
Post: #5
RE: Questions about "The Divine Code"
B"H
Thanks for your question!

"Parts I-IV: Guide to the Noahide Code" is an e-book / Kindle version of "The Divine Code," which so far has only Parts I-IV from the hard-copy edition you have. The format is a little different than the hard-copy version, in that the Kindle format puts all the footnotes at the end of the file, in numerical sequence from start to finish. Also, the Editor's notes have been inserted into the renumbered footnotes.

"Limited Edition Parts I-VII" is a hard-copy edition of the version you have. It is being printed and shipped from Israel. (The web page where it's ordered from still has an incorrect photo of the 608-page book; sorry about that.) A few more chapters have been added in Part VII (The Prohibition of Theft), and there has been some shortening of the footnotes, with the Editor's notes also moved into the footnotes (in order to keep the number of pages from getting too big for one book). We also omitted the Bibliography section. After it was printed, we found some errors in the cross-referencing of the renumbered footnotes, which I am now working on correcting for the next printing. That should be done before the end of 20'17, along with more chapters that will be added. Since you already have the book, my recommendation is that if you want a new hard-copy with more chapters added, check back with us near the end of December for the launch date of the next printing.
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